In Remembrance
Apr24

In Remembrance

  Tomorrow Australians, New Zealanders and people around the world will observe ANZAC Day, which broadly commemorates the contribution and suffering of all Australians and New Zealanders who have served and died in the armed forces during World Wars I and II, plus all worldwide conflicts, and peacekeeping operations since then. This year marks the centenary of the landing of the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) in Gallipoli on the morning of 25 April 1915. They were fighting to capture the Gallipoli Peninsula to allow the WWI Allies navies access to the Black Sea. However, they met with fierce resistance from the Ottoman Turks. Most remembrance ceremonies feature a reading of an occassion appropriate poem, which is traditionally the Ode. Laurence Binyon wrote the poem For the Fallen, from which the Ode comes, while sitting on the cliffs in north Cornwall in 1914, as a remembrance of British troops suffering heavy casualties in WWI. The poem has seven stanzas, however it is the fourth which became the League Ode. This was already used in association with commemoration services in Australia in 1921. “They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old; Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn. At the going down of the sun and in the morning We will remember them.” In honour of this national day, following are 20 nuggets of information about ANZAC Day that you may not have known....

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Lest We Forget
Apr22

Lest We Forget

For Australians, New Zealanders and people worldwide the line ‘Lest we forget’ is emotionally charged with patriotic virtue. The landings of the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) at Gallipoli have been marked since the military action in 1915, and ANZAC Day has been a public holiday in Australia and New Zealand since 1921. This Saturday people will acknowledge the sacrifice of all those who have died in war that and future wars, along with the contributions made and suffering of all those who have served in the armed forces. One New Zealand veteran had his own unique way showing his remembrance. When New Zealand man Bruce Neal left a Wellington tattoo parlour last week, he knew he was doing so with a permanent mark on his chest; but little did he know the mark he was about to make on social media. The 59-year old war veteran waited 41 years until he came across a design he loved – a series of ANZAC soldiers made up in the shape of New Zealand’s iconic emblem, the silver fern. The words ‘Lest We Forget’ are written underneath. He saw the image on a Wellington waterfront where WWI soldiers had left for Gallipoli around a century ago, and when his wife spotted the same design on television soon afterwards, Mr Neal knew it was a sign. “I thought ‘that’s it’. That means something to me,” Mr Neal said. …via New Zealand war veteran’s ANZAC...

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