Parnell Festival of Roses for the Lover of Blooms
Nov10

Parnell Festival of Roses for the Lover of Blooms

Picture a garden filled with breathtaking roses. How does that make you feel? Parnell gardens in Auckland transform into an enchanting haven. Witness it firsthand as roses go into full bloom.

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3 Exciting Things You Should not Miss in New Zealand’s Taranaki Fringe Garden Festival
Nov02

3 Exciting Things You Should not Miss in New Zealand’s Taranaki Fringe Garden Festival

Gardens full of colourful flower arrangements will be the spotlight of Taranaki Fringe Garden Festival. If you’re a true nature lover, you can enhance your gardening skills by exploring the wonders of this spectacular event.

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Floriade 2016: Starter Pack for First-Timers
Sep24

Floriade 2016: Starter Pack for First-Timers

In time for the Australian spring, flowers of magnificent varieties bloom their loveliest during the Floriade 2016 flower festival.

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5 Cactus Flowers that will Give You Transient Beauty
Aug29

5 Cactus Flowers that will Give You Transient Beauty

Tired of life’s pricks? Maybe it’s about time to take a break and spend some time to gaze at these lovely blossoms. Allow these cacti to give you a reason to smile.

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8 of the World’s Beautiful Endangered Plants
Aug26

8 of the World’s Beautiful Endangered Plants

We know with a heavy heart that this world, our home, is gradually becoming less stellar because of our unmindful activities. We empathise with our diminishing animals. It is now high time to give the limelight to the magnificent creations that are worthy of our attention. Here is a closer look of the world’s beautiful endangered plants and flower species.

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How-To: Propagating Succulents For Less To No Cost
Aug08

How-To: Propagating Succulents For Less To No Cost

I love succulents. Everyone loves succulents; and guess what, love indeed doesn’t cost a thing. Succulents are so easy to propagate that you don’t need to spend big bucks to have it planted in your garden or a terrarium inside your house.

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9 Most Stunning Gardens Every Flower Lover Must Visit in Their Lifetime
Jul06

9 Most Stunning Gardens Every Flower Lover Must Visit in Their Lifetime

Another from Australia is the Royal Botanic Gardens located near the heart of Melbourne, Victoria and south of the Yarra River.

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11 Best Types of Flowering Plants for Indoor Planting
Feb26

11 Best Types of Flowering Plants for Indoor Planting

Flowering plants serve a dual purpose in homes. Apart from their environmental function of improving air quality, they also serve as all-natural attractive decor that make your interiors look more cheerful and welcoming. While some people buy fresh flowers online to decorate their homes, you may want to consider growing some of them yourself. Below are some of the best types of flowering plants you can grow at home. PEACE LILY Peace Lilies are easy to grow inside the home. These plants are low maintenance and prefer less light which make them suited for rooms with lesser windows. The best thing about peace lilies is that they can help reduce toxins in the air thereby improving your home’s air quality. HIBISCUS If you’d like to have a tropical touch at home, hibiscus is the plant type for you. Its huge colourful blooms are truly noteworthy making it a gorgeous natural décor in your interiors. Additionally, hibiscus flowers come in a variety of colours including red, pink, orange, yellow and white. For healthy growing hibiscus plants, make sure the soil is evenly moist. AFRICAN VIOLET Some of the easiest types of plants to grow indoors are African violets. They bloom the entire year providing your home with colour and natural beauty. They favour filtered sunlight and warm conditions. These plants also come in hundreds of different varieties giving you plenty of choices to consider. BRAZILIAN FIREWORKS This plant got...

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The Gardens of Villa Éphrussi de Rothschild
Aug31

The Gardens of Villa Éphrussi de Rothschild

  The Gardens of Villa Éphrussi de Rothschild, France The gardens are in a Venetian style. They are seven gardens on the estate. They were crafted between 1905 and 1912, as Baroness Béatrice de Rothschild had the villa built. The central French style garden is surrounded those of Spanish, Japanese and Florentine design, plus an olive garden, one for exotic plants and a stone garden. sadlkfjslkdjfsdlkfjsaldfkjsdlkfj ref: Villa Éphrussi, Top 10 Gardens | National...

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Powerscourt Gardens
Jul27

Powerscourt Gardens

Powerscourt Estate HIstory The gardens and grand Palladian villa at Powerscourt, south of Dublin, feature 47 acres of formal gardens and a shaded lake. The grounds, waterfalls, parks, garden pavilions, and fine tree-lined arbors were influenced by the Italian Renaissance and the grand estates of France and Germany. Cascading terraces and formal landscapes are planned with carefully designed walks, all framed by the gentle beauty of the Wicklow and Sugar Loaf Mountains. Viscount Powerscourt is a title that has been created three times in the Peerage of Ireland, each time for members of the Wingfield family. It was created first in 1618 for the Chief Governor of Ireland, Richard Wingfield. Since the 18th century, the splendour and beauty of Powerscourt Gardens is due to the imagination and hard work of many generations of the Wingfield family. In 1961 the gardens passed to the Slazenger family, under whose aegis they have received much care and attention. The house was rebuilt in the decade after 1731 and the surrounding grounds were also remodelled. The design reflected the desire to create a garden which was part of the wider landscape. A century later the 6th Viscount Powerscourt instructed his architect, Daniel Robertson, to draw up new schemes for the gardens. Robertson was one of the leading proponents of Italianate garden design which was influenced by the terraces and formal features of Italian Renaissance...

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Lovely Lilies
Jul22

Lovely Lilies

  Lovely Lilies Know since ancient times, lovely Lilies continue to capture the imagination of people around the world.  This beautiful flower today often symbolises purity, chastity and innocence. Although in popular culture people refer to many blossoms as “lilies,” true lilies all belong to the genus Lilium. They develop from bulbs and tend to produce large blooms. Profound Symbolism Over the centuries, many people found the Lily inspirational. Probably one of the most famous discussion of Lilies occurs in the Sermon on the Mount, reported in Matthew 6:28-29: “And why take ye thought for raiment? Consider the lilies of the field, how they grow; they toil not, neither do they spin: And yet I say unto you, That even Solomon in all his glory was not arrayed like one of these.” Oriental And Asian Lilies Oriental Lilies produce extremely fragrant blossoms. They prefer partial shade and remain a garden favourite. By contrast, bright Asiatic Lilies are known more for their wide array of colours than for aroma. Many Asiatic Lilies today are hybrids, developed to produce a rich display of vividly hued blooms. Over the years, flower growers have introduced a huge variety of Lily hybrids. The blossoms of many of the varieties possess delicate speckles Popular Potted Plants Gardeners enjoy growing Lilies from bulbs, yet may find them challenging to protect from insect pests. However, Lilies will...

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Sanssouci Gardens
Jul13

Sanssouci Gardens

The Sanssouci Palace is the former summer palace of Frederick the Great, King of Prussia, in Potsdam, near Berlin. It is often counted among the German rivals of Versailles. The king built the splendid Rococo palace as his summer retreat, where he could live without a care,  or ‘sans souci’ in French. Busts of Roman emperors, decorative statues, and a Chinese teahouse dot the lavish grounds. Originally Frederick the Great merely wanted to cultivate plums, figs and wine grapes in Potsdam. In 1744, he had a terraced garden designed in Sanssouci Park for this purpose. However, due to the exceptionally beautiful view, a year later the king built his summer residence above the terraces. The New Palace and the picture gallery were constructed in subsequent years, while the slopes of the castle were used as flower and vegetable gardens. Today, you will also find Frederick II’s tomb on the castle hill. To the north of the castle are artificial sections of ruins that were grouped artistically as elements of an ancient world. These actually concealed a water basin, which would supply water to the lavish fountains that are a key feature of the gardens. The king was attached above all to these waterworks. However, he was only able to fully enjoy in later years, as the system only worked properly after the addition of a steam engine in the 19th century. The Baroque garden, which had gone out of fashion, was...

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Master of the Nets Garden
Jul06

Master of the Nets Garden

Historical Suzhou in China, is home to nine classical gardens that are regarded as the finest embodiments of Chinese “Mountain and Water” gardens, for which it is acknowledged as a UNESCO World Heritage site. These gardens lend insight into how ancient Chinese intellectuals harmonized concepts of aestheticism within an urban living environment. The most spectacular among these is the Master of the Nets Garden (网师园), which demonstrates Chinese garden designers’ adept skills for synthesizing art, nature, and architecture. “Master of the Nets” refers to the simple and solitary life of a Chinese fisherman, which is extolled in Chinese literature. A typical Qing style garden, the Master of the Nets was originally ordered to be built in the year of 1174 by the Southern Song Dynasty Deputy of Civil Service, Shi Zhengzhi. At that time it was named “Ten-thousand of scrolls Hall”. Over a period of 500 years from Song dynasty to Yuan, Ming and Qing Dynasties, the hosts of this garden were changed repeatedly, with it falling into disrepair. In 1785 it was restored by Song Zongyuan, a retired government official of the Qing Dynasty. He drastically redesigned the garden and added multiple buildings, but retained the spirit of the site. He often referred to himself as a fisherman and renamed it the Master of the Nets Garden. The garden was developed further by subsequent owners, however in 1958 the garden...

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A Guide to Popular Flowers: S – Z
Jun22

A Guide to Popular Flowers: S – Z

  Ready Flowers endeavours to provide customers with information about beautiful garden and gift bouquets. This list concludes this flower glossary series. This series of posts has covered the full A – Z of popular flowers. Some weeks ago we discussed key flowers in the A – G,  H – L and M – R range.  In connection with this guide’s information, you may want to consider some of these lovely popular plants and flowers in the S through Z range in your garden or as gifts: Snapdragon: These delicate blossoms sometimes carry the name “dragon flowers”, because they supposedly resemble the face of a dragon when squeezed sideways. They come in a wide array of sizes and colours, springing forth from extremely tiny seeds. A single plant will typically produce a multitude of beautiful blossoms, offering a stunning display. Spider Flower: Spider flowers include Cleome hassleriana, a popular garden flower native to South America. It typically produces white, purple or pink blossoms in which four petals offset six long, thin delicate stamens. It remains widely cultivated in temperate zones. Sunflower: These beautiful annual plants today occur in many shapes and sizes (frequently very large). The flower petals traditionally resembled the bright yellow rays of the sun. Today many varieties include orange and reddish blossoms. These plants prefer exposure to direct sunlight; during the day, the flower head...

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Beautiful Gerberas Bring Cheer!
Jun17

Beautiful Gerberas Bring Cheer!

  An Overview of a Delightful Flower Since its discovery in a South African gold mining field slightly over a century ago, the Gerbera Jamesonii has contributed enormously to both gardens and floral arrangements. Sometimes called “the African Daisy” or “the Barberton Daisy” (in honour of the gold field outside Barberton, South Africa)” this vividly coloured perennial remains a popular gift item in floral bouquets. It represents just one attractive type of Gerbera. Today Gerberas come in many lovely forms. They rank fifth in popularity as a cut flower. You’ll find them in a pleasing variety of sizes and colours, including white, yellow, orange, red, light purple and even multi-coloured. The bright petals of this plant may appear slender and spiky, or rounder in shape; in some flowers, the blossom itself measures 7″ in diameter! Gerberas take their name from a man who did not discover them. However, he did contribute significantly to the world of flowers and botany. Dr. Traugott Gerber lived between 1710 and 1743, and for several years he helped manage a botanical garden in Russia. Today most of the 300 forms of Gerberas available on the flower market descend from just two cultivars: the Gerbera Jamesonii or the Gerbera vindfolia. People love to see these beautiful distant relatives of the Daisy, Sunflower and Aster families in floral arrangements and gift baskets. Their...

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