Are you a flower lover?
Mar14

Are you a flower lover?

Take this quiz and find out.

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The Burning Beauty
Jan24

The Burning Beauty

Who would think that such beauty is a dear friend of fire? As delicate as this flower appears to be, don’t let its physical appearance fool you.

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30 Fun Flower Facts You Should Know
Nov29

30 Fun Flower Facts You Should Know

There are fun facts about blossoms that may not be known to us. I’ll spare you the hassle of reading your thick encyclopedias, and here are 30 flower facts to help you know them better.

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29 Pretty But Deadly Flowers
Oct18

29 Pretty But Deadly Flowers

These flowers look divine, but beware! Beauty is deceiving…

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7 Strange Yet Amazingly Beautiful Orchids
Aug22

7 Strange Yet Amazingly Beautiful Orchids

Mother Nature has an extraordinary way of impressing us. These beautiful but strange-looking orchids, for example, are way too amazing to believe they ever exist. But they do exist, and it’s high-time you get to know them. After all, you don’t want to miss half of your life.

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5 Native Australian Floras You Need To Know Right Now
Jul01

5 Native Australian Floras You Need To Know Right Now

In celebration of the NAIDOC Week, we listed down the native Australian flora that grows abundantly in its rainforests, mountain ranges, inland deserts, and sand dunes. Like the aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, these flowers are like no other in the world living for thousands of years since the beginning of time up to the present generation. Out of the 24,000 native Australian flora, below are five of the most common species.

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11 Best Types of Flowering Plants for Indoor Planting
Feb26

11 Best Types of Flowering Plants for Indoor Planting

Flowering plants serve a dual purpose in homes. Apart from their environmental function of improving air quality, they also serve as all-natural attractive decor that make your interiors look more cheerful and welcoming. While some people buy fresh flowers online to decorate their homes, you may want to consider growing some of them yourself. Below are some of the best types of flowering plants you can grow at home. PEACE LILY Peace Lilies are easy to grow inside the home. These plants are low maintenance and prefer less light which make them suited for rooms with lesser windows. The best thing about peace lilies is that they can help reduce toxins in the air thereby improving your home’s air quality. HIBISCUS If you’d like to have a tropical touch at home, hibiscus is the plant type for you. Its huge colourful blooms are truly noteworthy making it a gorgeous natural décor in your interiors. Additionally, hibiscus flowers come in a variety of colours including red, pink, orange, yellow and white. For healthy growing hibiscus plants, make sure the soil is evenly moist. AFRICAN VIOLET Some of the easiest types of plants to grow indoors are African violets. They bloom the entire year providing your home with colour and natural beauty. They favour filtered sunlight and warm conditions. These plants also come in hundreds of different varieties giving you plenty of choices to consider. BRAZILIAN FIREWORKS This plant got...

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Flowers – Inducing Positive Emotion
Dec10

Flowers – Inducing Positive Emotion

Flowers – Inducing Positive Emotion An interesting psychological study, led by Rutgers University psychologist Jeanette Haviland-Jones, has been conducted in order to discover the effects flowers have on emotion and memory.   It was partly funded by the Society of American Florists, which makes sense, because this is important information about how our consumers operate.  Do people buy flowers just because it’s a safe, traditional gift or are there other forces at work that influence their decision? The Duchenne Smile: The researchers looked for this sign, also known as the true smile, as an indicator of significantly increased mood.  The Duchenne smile is the one that not only scrunches up the cheeks but also the eyes.  It’s a full face smile and a “reliable indicator of happiness”. The Study was broken down into 3 main experiments: The first experiment was designed to test the short and long term mood shifts of women that were given a variety of gifts.  Some women were given large decorative candles, some were given fruit and sweets baskets while others were given mixed bouquets of roses, lilies and stocks.  The women that received the flowers all displayed the duchenne smile and had a long term increase in positive mood.  The other women all produced smiles with varying results and overall the duchenne smile was much less frequent with the other gifts.  Also interesting, is that the flower receivers were more...

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Less is more – the use of empty space
Nov10

Less is more – the use of empty space

It is common, in the flower industry, for customers to feel that bigger is better.  That the number of flowers in the arrangement should be proportionate to the number of dollars spent. Would the average customer be willing to spend the same amount of money on less flowers and more design?  Would they be willing to pay for empty space? The famous 20th century architect and designer, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, made the aphorism “Less is more” very popular and demonstrated this design theory through his very minimalist approach.  His emphasis was on simplicity of form and use of empty space. If we look to Japan, and the art form called Ikebana, we can see similar design ideals applied to floral arrangements.  Early records of Ikebana go back to the 6th century when Buddhism was introduced to the Japanese.  The flowers were presented as an offering in honor of Buddha.  From that point onward the Japanese introduced containers and furthered the art until Masters of the form arose and Ikebana schools were opened.  Over time the styles evolved and when Japan opened to the rest of the world the art form spread and grew. “What distinguishes IKEBANA from other approaches such as “flower arrangement” is its asymmetrical form and the use of empty space as an essential feature of the composition. A sense of harmony among the materials, the container, and the setting is also crucial.” (Ikebana International,...

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Lovely Lilies
Jul22

Lovely Lilies

  Lovely Lilies Know since ancient times, lovely Lilies continue to capture the imagination of people around the world.  This beautiful flower today often symbolises purity, chastity and innocence. Although in popular culture people refer to many blossoms as “lilies,” true lilies all belong to the genus Lilium. They develop from bulbs and tend to produce large blooms. Profound Symbolism Over the centuries, many people found the Lily inspirational. Probably one of the most famous discussion of Lilies occurs in the Sermon on the Mount, reported in Matthew 6:28-29: “And why take ye thought for raiment? Consider the lilies of the field, how they grow; they toil not, neither do they spin: And yet I say unto you, That even Solomon in all his glory was not arrayed like one of these.” Oriental And Asian Lilies Oriental Lilies produce extremely fragrant blossoms. They prefer partial shade and remain a garden favourite. By contrast, bright Asiatic Lilies are known more for their wide array of colours than for aroma. Many Asiatic Lilies today are hybrids, developed to produce a rich display of vividly hued blooms. Over the years, flower growers have introduced a huge variety of Lily hybrids. The blossoms of many of the varieties possess delicate speckles Popular Potted Plants Gardeners enjoy growing Lilies from bulbs, yet may find them challenging to protect from insect pests. However, Lilies will...

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The Beauty of Exotic Orchids
Jul01

The Beauty of Exotic Orchids

  One of the most exciting and beautiful types of flowers, the orchid, attracts a large following of hobbyists. Not only do these exotic blossoms appear in a wide variety of interesting colours, shapes and sizes, but many members of the Orchidaceae family also challenge the skills of gardeners. A Fascinating History The great naturalist Charles Darwin observed and wrote about numerous animals and plants, including the Orchid, a perennial. He worked during an era when collectors began searching for unusual and previously unknown types of Orchids, often vying with one another to locate and document especially rare or attractive varieties. Even today, intense competition exists among enthusiasts to grow new Orchids. The Shenzhen Nongke Group spent eight years developing a hybrid Orchid which eventually became the most expensive flower. The rare plant sold at auction in 2005 for 1.68 million Yuan (an amount equivalent to slightly over $200,000.) The Diversity of Orchids Around the world, scientists today have identified between 25,000 and 30,000 different types of Orchids. These plants grow in the wild on every continent except Antarctica. They often perpetuate through division. Approximately 1700 different Orchids live in Australia. Many Orchids prefer tropical climates. Some require highly specific environmental conditions in order to bloom. Others display flowers for only a limited period of time. In fact,...

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A Guide to Popular Flowers: S – Z
Jun22

A Guide to Popular Flowers: S – Z

  Ready Flowers endeavours to provide customers with information about beautiful garden and gift bouquets. This list concludes this flower glossary series. This series of posts has covered the full A – Z of popular flowers. Some weeks ago we discussed key flowers in the A – G,  H – L and M – R range.  In connection with this guide’s information, you may want to consider some of these lovely popular plants and flowers in the S through Z range in your garden or as gifts: Snapdragon: These delicate blossoms sometimes carry the name “dragon flowers”, because they supposedly resemble the face of a dragon when squeezed sideways. They come in a wide array of sizes and colours, springing forth from extremely tiny seeds. A single plant will typically produce a multitude of beautiful blossoms, offering a stunning display. Spider Flower: Spider flowers include Cleome hassleriana, a popular garden flower native to South America. It typically produces white, purple or pink blossoms in which four petals offset six long, thin delicate stamens. It remains widely cultivated in temperate zones. Sunflower: These beautiful annual plants today occur in many shapes and sizes (frequently very large). The flower petals traditionally resembled the bright yellow rays of the sun. Today many varieties include orange and reddish blossoms. These plants prefer exposure to direct sunlight; during the day, the flower head...

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Beautiful Gerberas Bring Cheer!
Jun17

Beautiful Gerberas Bring Cheer!

  An Overview of a Delightful Flower Since its discovery in a South African gold mining field slightly over a century ago, the Gerbera Jamesonii has contributed enormously to both gardens and floral arrangements. Sometimes called “the African Daisy” or “the Barberton Daisy” (in honour of the gold field outside Barberton, South Africa)” this vividly coloured perennial remains a popular gift item in floral bouquets. It represents just one attractive type of Gerbera. Today Gerberas come in many lovely forms. They rank fifth in popularity as a cut flower. You’ll find them in a pleasing variety of sizes and colours, including white, yellow, orange, red, light purple and even multi-coloured. The bright petals of this plant may appear slender and spiky, or rounder in shape; in some flowers, the blossom itself measures 7″ in diameter! Gerberas take their name from a man who did not discover them. However, he did contribute significantly to the world of flowers and botany. Dr. Traugott Gerber lived between 1710 and 1743, and for several years he helped manage a botanical garden in Russia. Today most of the 300 forms of Gerberas available on the flower market descend from just two cultivars: the Gerbera Jamesonii or the Gerbera vindfolia. People love to see these beautiful distant relatives of the Daisy, Sunflower and Aster families in floral arrangements and gift baskets. Their...

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Weddings, what the customer is looking for.
Jun10

Weddings, what the customer is looking for.

As you know, when it comes to weddings, people want the day to run and look just the way they have imagined it will be.  That means that they will be very careful when they are selecting every element that will contribute to their vision of the day.  The competition for florists is considerable and it all comes down to convincing the customer that you can provide their vision. The internet these days is host to a huge array of websites filled with ideas on wedding decorations, themes and floral designs.  Many of them encourage people to buy cut flowers wholesale and design their own arrangements.  Still more advise soon-to-be-weds on how to choose a floral designer.  All of these sites emphasise the importance of consulting at least three florists before making a choice.  So how do you make sure that you win over these savvy window shoppers?  They are, in effect, interviewing you and knowing what they are looking for is the first step.  Here is the checklist that a lot of the sites are advising people to look for in a floral designer: • Was the florist willing to spend the time you required during your initial consultation? • Was he/she professional, prompt, and courteous? • Did he/she listen to your ideas? • Did he/she “get it”? And did he/she make suggestions that you liked? • Was he/she knowledgeable, for instance did he/she suggest which flowers would be in season? • Did he/she have a portfolio of...

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Tulip History
Jun02

Tulip History

Tulips are bulbous plants in the lily family. Originally cultivated in the Ottoman Empire (present-dayTurkey), tulips were imported into Holland at the end of the sixteenth century by Carolus Clusius. He initially planted tulips at the Vienna Imperial Botanical Gardens in 1573. After he was appointed director of the Leiden University’s newly established Hortus Botanicus, he planted some of his tulip bulbs here in late 1593. Thus, 1594 is considered the date of the tulip’s first flowering in the Netherlands, despite reports of the cultivation of tulips in private gardens in Antwerp and Amsterdam two or three decades earlier. As the Dutch Golden Age grew, so did this curvaceous and colourful flower and the tulips at Leiden would eventually lead to the tulip industry in the Netherlands. Carolus Clusius wrote the first major book on tulips in 1592, and is largely responsible for the spread of tulip bulbs in the final years of the sixteenth century. While a faculty member in the school of medicine at the University of Leiden, Clusius planted both a teaching garden and his private garden with tulips. They became so popular that his garden was raided and bulbs stolen on a regular basis. Between 1634 and 1637, the enthusiasm for the new flowers triggered a speculative frenzy now known as the”Tulip Mania” (tulipomania). Tulip bulbs became so expensive that they were treated as a form of currency, or...

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